the friend online
16 May 2008

Quakers at the UN - preview
International human rights law may seem remote and unenforceable, but its impact is much greater than is evident
  • The unglamorous work of developing and strengthening it is part of the daily reality of the Quaker commitment to human rights work at the United Nations, writes Rachel Brett

    Imagine what might have happened in the wake of the 9/11 attack on the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York if there had been no international human rights law


  • As it was, a number of countries, including in Europe, reacted with arbitrary detentions, torture and inhuman and degrading treatment, abrogation of the normal judicial processes, discriminatory 'profiling' and by talking about reintroducing the death penalty
  • Such actions were not unpopular in many quarters, at least initially

  • Rachel Brett

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    News round-up
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    Human rights and political responsibilities
    Michael Bartlet, guest editor
    Umntu Ngumntu Ngabantu
    Jeremy Routledge & Nozizwe Madlala-Routledge
    Letters
    editorial@thefriend.org
    A basic necessity
    Fiona MacTaggart
    Quakers at the UN
    Rachel Brett
    The role of the church
    Nicholas Sagovsky
    Time to break the cycle of modern-day slavery
    Alex Porter and Klara Skrivankova
    Homeless without help
    Jennifer Kavanagh
    Inequality matters
    Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett
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